Tag Archives: naturedeficitsyndrome

Outdoor Classrooms Improve Indoor Learning

horns

Last week I had the opportunity to do one of my favorite activities: educating children about our forest habitat. Often I have the job of shepherding groups of children through the deciduous forest in which we live, but this time I had a station where I was talking about the animals that live in our forests in Virginia. Believe it or not, I love doing this! I was speaking with 2nd graders, so they were very energetic – it was a field trip after all! – but they were also full of wonder. I truly believe that wonder and information are what will enable all of us to live more peaceably with the natural world. We talked about habitats, and food chains, bob cats and deer, coyotes, foxes, and rabbits, and, of course, skunks. For the girl who suggested a million times that every creature we discussed should eat fish, we talked about river otters. Overall, it was a wonderful time. They learned a lot, and I lost my voice!

Then I came back and did a little research, as I love to do, to see what has been published on the topic. I was curious because my children’s school has a beautiful outdoor classroom that is in a similar forest, but it’s been my experience that sometimes teachers feel it’s a lot of trouble to go out there. I am very sympathetic to their viewpoint, and as someone who knows I could never be a teacher and stands in awe of all they do every day, please know that’s not a criticism. So I thought it was interesting that a recent publication in a 2017 issue of Frontiers in Psychology (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5758746/) suggests that children are more attentive and focused indoors in the period after they’ve spent time learning in an outdoor classroom. Good news! And that goes along with all the research that suggests time outdoors enhances our memory and attention – adults AND children! So teachers, if you want happier, better behaved, more focused children – find a way to take them outside for a nature lesson.

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Hiking Makes Us Happy

Waterfall

We discovered a new favorite hike this past weekend – the Rose River Loop Trail in the Shendandoah National Park. The trail is moderately challenging, with plenty of areas where you have to clamber up and down rocks. But it also descends through thick forest to the Rose River. There are plenty of waterfalls large and small to see along the way. We were not able to spend as much time as we would have wanted along the river, because we didn’t bring towels and swimsuits. We also had our dog with us, and a couple with a dog was behind us, so we felt some pressure to continue on. Unfortunately, our dog is a vigorous and sonorous barker, and he would simply have barked the whole way if they were in front.

So, guess what? A three hour hike in the mountains has been shown to make people happier than staying home. That’s no surprise to someone like me, who loves to hike! That data comes from a May 2017 PLoS One article published by a team from Austria (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28520774). They compared people who hiked for three hours with indoor treadmill activity or sedentary activity, and found that hiking generally improved mood best. Their conclusion – hikes should be on the prescription pad! My only thought is that if the hike took place with a group, or even a few other people, there’s the social factor as well, to consider. I don’t know if one would be happier hiking solo. I know I prefer company!

I was hiking with my husband and my two elementary school age boys, as well as the dog.

So, a couple of tips for hiking with children:

(1) make sure you have lots of snacks and water, and the patience to stop frequently for snacks and water.

(2) let go of any fantasy that your children will enjoy the whole thing. Sometimes they will, and sometimes they fuss loudly.

(3) take swimming gear and clean clothes, especially if you’ll be around waterfalls. And be prepared for the hassle of having to change the kids in and out of said clothes or swim gear.

(4) take bug spray

(5) give everyone a whistle. We did have a child wander off the path and get turned around. However, he panicked fast and yelled loudly, so we could find him quickly. Another child who panics less quickly might have gone further.