Tag Archives: Green play

If “Green Space” Were a Pill …

Cypress Knees Chippokes SP

When my father came to visit, we spent only a small portion of time at home, mostly to cook or play Monopoly. Otherwise, he and I and my boys were out in the natural world, visiting state parks and throwing treats to the sea birds that follow the ferries near us. The good news is that we do not always have to travel to a state park to get to our “green space” – in fact a short 5 minute walk takes us to a very nice trail that curves through forests and around ponds and grassy meadows.

It turns out, especially for children, that having to walk more than 20 minutes to a green space is correlated with poor health and wellbeing. I found this out when I was reading a fascinating article that reviewed research examining children’s wellbeing and green space. The review, published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing (http://www.pediatricnursing.org/article/S0882-5963(17)30185-9/fulltext), ultimately included information from over 75,000 children in multiple studies.

The overall benefits of spending time in green space, for children, were such a long promising list, I started thinking about pharmaceuticals. Imagine, if you will, a parent who is told, “This pill, taken at least once daily, could improve your child’s memory, focus, attention, friendships, and self-esteem while reducing stress, attention deficit, hyperactivity, and problem behaviors. Oh, and you can actually take this pill as often as needed, with few side effects. If you have to take a break from this pill, there will be no harmful withdrawal symptoms!”

Well, that’s green space for you. Take your daily green space prescription daily, and it’s good for you and your children. The problem for a lot of parents and caregivers is simply a matter of access. How do you get to safe green space? If it’s greater than 20 minutes by foot, people won’t go. Time is another issue. In working families, evenings are packed with dinner, homework, and sometimes other activities – leaving very little time for that all important green time. And, let’s face it, children are not always cooperative and interested in going for a walk in the woods or by a lake! But — they are not much more cooperative with taking pills for any of the problems outside play time in a green area can address. So, parents, would you rather have your child fuss at you for trying to get them out into nature, or fuss at you and refuse to take their meds? By the way, as always, I am not saying that medication isn’t sometimes necessary. Children who have to take medication for behavioral health issues also can benefit from green space! And there’s no nasty medication interaction to worry about ….

The author of this review article makes a crucial plea for thinking about including more green space in developed areas, such as neighborhoods, schools, and even hospital gardens. Ya’ll, we humans respond so well to nature that simply looking out a window at a natural setting, or looking at a photograph of nature on the wall, can reduce our stress. Let’s not be stingy with what the planet gives us.

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ADHD is a walk in the park! Literally

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“My child just can’t pay attention! We are trying everything! I’m at my wits end!”

I hear this often from my friends who have children with what the adults around them call attention issues. Although the trend towards instantly medication children with ADHD seems to be losing strength, I still know many parents who have been told – or believe – that their child has attention problems. And then they are placed on the roller coaster of trying the numerous strategies for coping with attention that are out there (many of which are effective, don’t get me wrong).

But I want to highlight the importance of getting all children out into nature. Every child benefits, but children with ADHD (diagnosed or not) seem to benefit more than most.

My personal view of this is that children need to run and play, and every single day should begin with recess, PE, or a walk in a natural setting, so that children can focus better. The research supports this, by the way – a 20-minute walk in a natural setting improves children’s attention and memory. And you can chalk that up to the natural setting – researchers found that a walk in an urban setting did not lead to as much improvement, according to research published in a 2009 issue of the Journal of Attention Disorders. Yes, that’s old research, but as long as children are not starting their day off with a 20 minute walk in nature, I think it’s worth talking about why. This doesn’t have to be “wasted” time, either. A nature walk is an excellent opportunity for hands on learning and social skills building. It’s important to remember that children feel a natural awe over things that we adults might not even pay attention to anymore. A huge sunflower, the patterns of bark, the tiniest inch worm – children have a depth of appreciation for the minutiae that benefits all of us.

Alright, so let’s say that taking a walk in a park isn’t feasible for the 4.4 million children who are thought to have attention deficit or hyperactivity disorders. There’s another way – green play areas. I am not talking about hard metal bars painted green! Kids who have the opportunity to play in a space that has a variety of greenery – shrubs, flowers, trees, grass – have milder attention deficit symptoms than their ADHD peers who are in less green play spaces. Perhaps not surprisingly, children with hyperactivity do best in wide open green spaces, according to researchers publishing in the November 2011 issue of Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Again, old news, maybe – but take a journey around the schools in your area and you will probably not see the kinds of green play areas that would most benefit children.

At the very least, parents, let’s start making an effort to go walk in a park as often as possible with our kids. All this data applies to elementary school age children, by the way. We’ll explore the relationship between middle school and high school youth and green space at a later date.

Here’s what you can do –

  • If you have children, try to get them outside into parks as often as possible. Outside in general is good, of course, but the more diverse the greenery, animals, and birds, the better for them (and you!)
  • Advocate with your local schools, school board, or community for greener spaces – outdoor classrooms, school gardens, and so on. Of course, if you are committed enough to this to become a Master Gardener or a Master Naturalist, that’s even better! Volunteering is good for you too. But, it’s true that those green spaces require maintenance and even teachers sometimes need another trained adult to help them get the most out of green areas.
  • Create diverse green spaces in your neighborhoods and even indoors in your buildings. Make them inviting and friendly to children, as well as to parents.