Simplicity is Complicated

I’ve been writing for over 20 years now (!). I continue to be surprised that simplicity is often the best solution to the health problems people face. But simplicity seems difficult. Why is simplicity a challenge? I don’t have an answer, but I do have a theory. I think it’s hard because we actually want complexity. It’s as if the complexity and difficulty of what we have to do will validate the challenge ahead of us.

I’ll give you an example. Allergic asthma can be a very scary situation. There’s nothing simple or easy about not being able to breathe. That said, the answer to some allergic asthma could be as simple as changing your cleaning strategy at home or avoiding the situations that might a be a trigger. Better cleaning might mean using a HEPA vacuum cleaner more regularly, choosing fragrance-free products, or getting rid of any mold and mildew. Check out some ideas in this article I wrote for Everydayhealth: http://www.everydayhealth.com/hs/allergic-asthma-in-adults/allergic-asthma/

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Meditation and Motivation

Very interesting writing in the August 2015 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease suggests that even a small amount of daily meditation (12 minutes) could bolster cognitive abilities, memory, sleep, and help reduce stress in people who are experiencing cognitive decline. The author goes a bit further and suggests this could prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is profoundly complicated, and it seems that the more researches dig into it, the more its course resembles the very tangled protein plaques that define it.

I will say this about meditation, as I have been practicing it daily now for a while (and off and on since my 20s) – I do believe that a regular practice could improve one’s quality of life mentally, physically, and spiritually, regardless of where your health journey is taking you. Meditation would perhaps be even more beneficial for the caregivers of people who are experiencing cognitive decline. One of my articles about stress management has been picked up by a caregivers website, and I am sharing it here for anyone who needs some ideas during stressful times. (http://www.caregiversamerica.com/company-blog/10-tips-to-help-you-de-stress)

Personally I am working with the meditation approach taught by John Main and others in the WCCM community (www.wccm.org) There are, however, no magic bullets in this approach. The lasting benefits of meditation seem to come through daily practice over an extended period of time – but almost anyone would probably feel a bit more in control and less stressed by taking at least a few minutes to close their eyes, sit, breathe, and let go of the worries and anxieties that roll constantly through the mind!